The path to understanding the brain: Henry Markram at TEDxCHUV

Translator: Michele Gianella Reviewer: Capa Girl I’d like to tell you about the Human Brain Project, which is basically a CERN for brain research, to accelerate our understanding of the human brain. You have witnessed, I think, a very good example of the passion, Gregoire, the hope, and the progress of understanding the human brain, in lots of different forms.…

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Why Are Some People Left-Handed?

[MUSIC] [MUSIC] Evolution spent nearly 400 million years crafting these works of art, two of the most important pieces of the human evolutionary puzzle. Yet 99% of us end up being good with one hand and not the other, for common tasks like writing, high-fiving, and the all-important one-handed texting. Even life itself seems to have chosen sides: our amino…

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What happens in your brain when you taste food | Camilla Arndal Andersen

Translator: Ivana Korom Reviewer: Krystian Aparta So I had this very interesting experience five years ago. You know, me and my husband, we were out grocery shopping, as we do every other day, but this time, we found this fancy, you know, I’m talking fair-trade, I’m talking organic, I’m talking Kenyan, single-origin coffee that we splurged and got. And that…

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Building a Computer Like Your Brain

The human brain is the most powerful supercomputer in the world. All right, let’s see this electrical headquarters of yours in operation. It helps us navigate our environment by carrying out about one thousand trillion logical operations per second. It’s compact, uses less power than a lightbulb and has potentially endless storage. The human brain is really one of the…

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Why the human brain loves opioids

For centuries, societies have coveted opioids for the euphoria and the pain relief they provide. In the 1800s, when chemists extracted morphine from opium poppies, it became the go-to treatment for the American Civil War. After morphine caused widespread addiction, drug companies invented what they thought was a “non-addictive” substitute: a cough syrup called heroin. That turned out poorly for…

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The brain vs. the mind: Has Freud slipped? — with Peter Kramer (1995) | THINK TANK

Ben Wattenberg: Hello, I’m Ben Wattenberg. Was Sigmund Freud right? Is most mental illness rooted in childhood trauma, often sexual trauma? That Freudian view has shaped much of the modern world. Now a new school of scientists say many disorders of the mind are really physical diseases of the brain and can often be treated with new drugs. Joining us…

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Early Intervention for Psychosis: Building a Mental Health Community | Rachel Waford | TEDxDecatur

Translator: Daniel Enger Reviewer: Tanya Cushman So as psychologists and counselors, we spend quite a lot of time and energy trying to create spaces that are open and accepting and safe. Now, that doesn’t keep people from feeling really apprehensive to visit our spaces to share examples of challenge and distress. This is especially true for individuals experiencing psychotic illnesses…

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